Hiring

How to build a strong engineering culture through engineering values

Learn how engineering values can help you build a strong engineering culture and empower your developers to make decisions that are aligned with your goals.

Responsibilities of a Chief Data Officer

In this episode, I talk to Patrick Wagstrom. Patrick is the Chief Data Officer at Brightcove. Before that Patrick was the director of emerging technology at Verizon, meaning that he leveraged AI/ML, augmented reality, blockchain, IoT, quantum computing, and even 5G.  Before that, he was a senior director of data science at Capital One. Even before that, he was a “research nerd”(his own term) at IBM working on the Watson project.

We talk about:

  • his role and responsibilities as a chief data officer,
  • the difference between building systems that support machine learning and systems that don’t,
  • distributed software engineering,
  • data governance and GDPR,
  • and how to make sure your AI model is unbiased.

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Transcript:

 Coming soon…

Using Entrepreneurship 101 to Build a New Profitable Business

In this episode, I talk to Karls Hughes. Karl is a software engineer who turned into an entrepreneur in the midst of the pandemic last year. His start-up draft.dev creates content that reaches software engineers – which means he combined his two passions, development and content creation.

We talk about:

  • his transition from developer to CTO, and then to the business owner,
  • value-based pricing and how to focus on the customer segment that gets the most value out of your product,
  • how to scale as a bootstrapped business,
  •  why blogging is such a career changer for developers.

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Transcript: How to build a profitable content business as a developer

[00:00:00] Michaela: Hello, and welcome to the software engineering unlocked podcast. I’m your host, Dr. McKayla. And today I have the pleasure to talk to Karl Hughes. Karl is a software engineer who turned into an entrepreneur in the midst of the pandemic last year, his startup draft up that creates content that reaches software engineers, which means that he combined his two passions development and content creation.

Today, I will ask him all about his new business and what he ambitions and what he wants to reach. So like,

[00:00:31] Karl: Thanks for having me Mikayla.

[00:00:33] Michaela: So maybe I introduced you a lot with this new startup, but actually what I want to start off with is the startup or the side project that I know you from, and that is CFP land call for paper land.

Right? How do you pronounce it thing? You see a few?

[00:00:48] Karl: Yeah, we, I, I say, I say CFP land for short, but CFP stands for call for papers or call for proposals depending on who you ask.

[00:00:56] Michaela: Exactly. So it’s, it’s a sideways. I find all the relevant tech conferences. Right. And then know where to submit it, how to submit.

And so I think from that, I know actually your activities a little bit. And so, so how is that going? Like it had had to been really hard for the pandemic and everything. No, no, no conference.

[00:01:17] Karl: Yeah, it’s been a weird year and a half for CFP land. So I started the kind of backstory on that. I started speaking at conferences a few years ago and just for fun and to kind of get out there and meet more people and learn things.

And so it was great. I had a lot of fun, met a lot of people, but one of the challenges, a lot of the speakers. And we would always talk about it. It’s like, where do we find all the CFPs that are available when they close? Like where do we apply? What kind of speakers they looking for? Things like that. And so I started off CFE land.

It’s just a simple newsletter, just running it. You know, it was very much a side project and eventually I got. It grew. And it’s now a website with a newsletter it’s well, over 2000 people subscribed to it. So it’s a pretty popular, I mean, this is a small world [00:02:00] of tech conference speakers, but it’s pretty popular within that small world.

So a lot of people do hear my name from it, but it’s always been just a thing to do on the side. I actually, the year, the beginning of last year, when right before the pandemic happened, I was thinking about, as I was thinking about starting with. Maybe I would make CFE land or something like it, a full-time thing, which was fortunately, I didn’t go all in on that site because it was really, I mean, it went from, you know, we were getting consistently growing traffic to all of a sudden, just almost to zero overnight and yeah, I mean, I’m glad it was just a hobby project.

It’s starting to come back. Now. Things are starting to, you know, conferences are starting to like look at coming in person. And also just the virtual events are starting to get more predictable. People are figuring out how to work them. So all of it I think, is going to come back and it’s going to be, you know, I’ll put more effort into it this year, but yeah, it’s been a tough year for, for the project and for anybody who’s into event marketing and.

Yeah, I can

[00:02:56] Michaela: imagine. I mean, I started off with on-site trainings and it wasn’t like good starting March, like grew up. So. And how, why do you change from like you were employed before, right? You were a software engineer, you were a manager. So how did you change from that to become your own boss? So why, why during the pandemic, was that something that you did deliberately or something that, you know, just the events happened and this is how it go.

[00:03:30] Karl: Yeah, that’s a good question. So, you know, I’ve been with the startup. Uh, I I’ve always worked in startups, tech startups, like small companies, less than a hundred people. And so I started off just as a software engineer and was then most recently like leading a team of engineers. And I really enjoyed it. I actually liked my company a lot, but unfortunately the business was pretty strongly affected negatively by the pandemic.

And so myself and the rest engineers went down to half-time to kind of conserve money and make sure the company. Get through it and figure out what we’re going to do next. [00:04:00] And so in that half-time I started to explore, well, what do I want to do? Maybe, you know, maybe I’ll do something different next.

Maybe I’ll try a career shift. So I started writing for fun on the side, just, just kind of called up some people I knew and started writing technical blog posts for them. And then I found some lists of places you could write technical blog posts. And I realized there’s a lot of people who want engineers who were willing to write some blog posts on this.

I figured it was a good mix of my skills and it also was not negatively affected by the pandemic, like speaking was and things like that. So I started doing it and I realized quickly that there was a lot of companies that wanted this kind of content and that I could work with other engineers to sort of increase my output.

Knit draft out dev was kind of born out of just seeing so many people ask me, Hey, could you write for us? And I just realized I only had so many hours, so I better start bringing some other people in on this. So yeah, that it was really. I needed something to do on the side. And then eventually it became a full-time thing within three or four months.

I think I had transitioned out of my old job and was doing draft out dev full-time with a very small team at first. Yeah.

[00:05:01] Michaela: And so right now, are you still writing content? Are you mainly managing people that write for you?

[00:05:07] Karl: Yeah, mostly managing now. So it grew pretty quickly this year. I think it’s about quadrupled in size from what it was in January, which is, feels surreal.

So I’m almost exclusively managing hiring and kind of helping other people get unstuck. I still do a lot of sales calls as well, but the, yeah, the bulk of our work is done by software engineers. Blog posts around the world. And so for them, it’s a nice little nice and weekends thing they can do. They make some extra money and they get to learn new technology and write about it.

Show what they know for our clients. They’re getting experts who are interested in their tools and their tech tech that they write.

[00:05:45] Michaela: Yeah. Cool. That’s really cool. So how do you make the match between the people that you know, right. And the people that want things written?

[00:05:55] Karl: Yeah. We’ve got kind of a word it’s still an evolving process for sure.

[00:06:00] We do some recruits. Of writers that are in specific skillsets when need be. And then we put all of our writers into a list, and if you’re on our writer list, you get an email every couple of weeks. That’s kind of like, here’s all the open opportunities for writing. And we have people sort of like give us, just basically apply to, to write for each of them.

And we ended up trying to match up the best writers with the topics because, you know, we tell a client might. An article done in PHP and JavaScript and Ruby and you know, something else instead of like, we’ve got to find like a mix of writers to cover all those, which is, can be really tricky. But our, our pool of writers now is I think 50 or 60 active writers.

And so it makes it easier once you’ve got a pretty good volume of writers. Pick up the assignments.

[00:06:45] Michaela: Okay. And do you vet them somehow? Do you look at the can right or that, I mean, there’s also like a reason out there. Right? So people just call from the side.

[00:06:57] Karl: It’s a huge, that’s a huge undertaking. I mean, this is why this is why clients like working with us because it is a lot of work to try to find and vet good engineers who are also good writers.

So we do have a process. We start with a rubric, a skills rubric, but one thing that I learned as an engineering manager was it’s really helpful to hire people based on objective criteria, as much as possible. That’s not, you know, there’s always a little bit of fuzziness when you’re working with humans, but like we try to have like a pretty objective rubric that allows us to.

Great or rate each applicant based on specific criteria around like, how good did they do at writing? How good are they do explaining deep technical topics? How good were they at? Uh, things like communication and answering emails promptly, just, you know, being in touch. Uh, and then we evaluate each candidate and we’ll accept or accept or ask for more samples from each one.

So we do ask for existing published samples or sort of written sample of their work. You know, most of the engineers who were. Pretty experienced as far as writers and engineers, because we are a lot of the topics that we cover are kind of [00:08:00] hard to cover, uh, sort of things that most junior developers would have a hard time maybe picking up on the first try.

[00:08:06] Michaela: Yeah. Yeah. So maybe one thing that comes to my mind. I’m also like a intrepreneur and I’m doing mostly workshops and cultural workshops. I’m also doing consultancy right now. I’m doing quite a bit of research again. And so that’s, that’s exciting, but on the other hand, but I’m always feeling like I always have this urge I have to program again.

Right. So I’m not constantly programming because while that’s not my job right now, but if I like, if I’m in one source, Six big of a dollar 3d programming, something. I feel like, oh my God, I’m losing cash. And I really want to go back into it and I’m coding something on the side and I’m always like, I’m, I’m still struggling with how to, you know, make that a habit that it’s always constantly there because I feel it’s so, so important.

I mean, especially for me, but I think also if you are, you know, if you’re a Def shop for writers, I think it’s important. Stay at death somehow. I don’t know. How, how is that for you? I think it’s also the same for managing, right? If you’re in a managerial role and you’re managing people, how far can like a CTO or a engineering manager?

How far can they be away from actually doing the stuff? Right. I think it’s so. Um, I spent a lot of time, the last couple of weeks, really getting, knowing everything about the latest code review tools that are out there and, you know, all the studying and Ella analyzes again. And you have to do that, I think periodically because otherwise you really lose touch.

How do you think about that and how do you, you know, how do you combine that with what you do right.

[00:09:41] Karl: Yeah, I agree. I think that there’s a lot of value in staying in touch with the technical skills. Even if you like, I’ve always admitted to my employees and myself, I’m not the best engineer who’s ever written code.

Right. Like that’s okay with me. It’s okay. Really love working with people who are good because they are way better because [00:10:00] then you get to see sort of like, oh man, humbling experiences. Right. And reminds you. But I do think it’s important for engineering managers, CTOs, who are at least at smaller companies, CTOs to stay at least somewhat connected to what’s going on on the ground.

So the way I do that, A couple of things. First I do occasionally for fun, write my own technical articles. So I do it for say like guest posting on, uh, on different blogs or maybe on my own personal site or other sites around that people ask me to write for. So I do that some just to keep up with what’s going on.

I think I did pick up like a client article a couple of weeks ago because I thought it was an interesting topic and I wanted to get my feet wet in it. And then the other thing. Is I, well, what I find is that it is easier to pick up new tech when you’ve already picked up several things along your career.

So unlike when you’re first learning to code, you know, a lot of junior engineers always ask like, well, how do you, how do you just pick up a new language so quickly? I’m like, well, when you’ve learned four or five, the sixth is not that much harder because a lot of the same paradigms, the same concepts apply.

The same is true. If they. When you’ve used six different web hosts in your career, likely the seventh one is not that much different so that you probably don’t have to learn everything from scratch. Same like any CIS CD tools, testing tools, whatever, like, yes, there is some difference and yes, there’s subtle things that are important to know the differences between, but like, you don’t have to always be the, you know, you don’t have to know everything from the root level.

You just kind of have to get a good high-level sense of how is this different from the other things I’ve done in the past that are similar.

[00:11:31] Michaela: Yeah, that’s true. I mean, as I said, I was looking at study analysis tools recently and obviously it’s different. Right. It’s different because it’s more integrated in.

In dev ops, for example, in CII CD. Right. It’s a little bit more automated, but in the end it was the same, like the same as 10 years ago. Right. So, yeah. Yeah, I totally, and, and the same, like for languages, [00:12:00] I feel that picking up, and this is something that I really, I mean, I love to talk about it because I feel like you can pick it up.

Fast, but then really getting really good at it. It’s even, I think sometimes a little bit harder if you have a lot of baggage, right? So like coming from the object oriented Java and C-sharp world. And I recently it’s not recent anymore, but like two and a half years ago, I started with. And I mean, obviously I could program and I could, could really productively do stuff within really short amount of time.

I mean, it was days that I, you know, and, but then I feel like stuck and I feel like, oh, it really took me quite some time to understand, you know, and feel comfortable really that I know how to architecture and I’ve heightened. I could architecture, but it was like it was a job or a C sharp application heightened.

Which didn’t feel like it’s not by tonic and it’s not like how you would do it in that language and learning that and changing the mental models that you already have. I found that quite, quite interesting and tricky. How, how, how has that.

[00:13:06] Karl: I agree. I, that is tricky. I think one thing that I’ve thought about in this transition from being like engineering leader, who’s expected to still really know the tech to more of a business owner is that I, I don’t necessarily have to be the best at those lower level, that lower level of knowledge, right?

The specific implementation details. I may not always be the best, but at a high level, I shouldn’t have. How does Python work versus Java? Like I should know that it’s almost like knowing what you don’t know is good. So knowing that I’m not going to write Python at code, like you call it is maybe helpful more than just knowing like exactly the best way to write Python, because you can always, when you’re, again, kind of going back, putting my business owner hat, My goal is to make the company run well.

So that might mean hiring somebody who knows these things better than me. It might mean hiring technical reviewers in the future. As I get less connected to the day to day, it might mean hiring well, we already do this. We hire a lot of [00:14:00] writers who are experienced in languages and frameworks that I really haven’t used much if at all.

So yeah, it’s definitely important to like, know where your limits are and then be like, ask yourself the question of, you know, is this the best thing for me to learn myself? Or can I hire someone? To who knows it already and get even more, more bandwidth out of this.

[00:14:20] Michaela: Yeah, I like that mindset. I mean, in general, maybe that’s what I want to deep dive a little bit with you.

Is that mindset of, you know, the manager, a CTO or also a business owner? I think I’m, I’m, I’m still struggling with that. I like two years ago with this one. I totally didn’t feel like it. And so even though I started already my business, I would never say to myself, like, I’m the founder or, you know, business owners thing.

I always say like, I’m a software engineer. Right? Like, and, and it really took me one and a half years to say, okay, I feel a little bit comfortable. You know, I’m doing now my tags and all of that, but I still, I still struggle with, for example, sales. Right. It’s just something that. I dunno, like, and, but you were talking about Sage, like I’m doing sales calls and all of that.

So how do you get into that mindset of actually doing the stuff that a business owner does versus, you know, doing the stuff that an engineer does?

[00:15:17] Karl: Yeah. I mean, there’s nothing, so I’ll just like play the other side and say there’s nothing wrong with becoming a, a business owner consultant who stays. Very much a software engineer.

Let’s say, you know, I have several friends who are consultants or freelancers that essentially like they, they have a very flexible, interesting work where they can do, you know, work for several different clients, but they don’t really have a bunch of employees there. It’s kind of just them being a freelancer.

And that’s a great, that’s fine. There’s nothing wrong with that. But if you sort of. If your goal is to build a company that runs either without you, or it runs with you being able to take a vacation, things like that, then you kind of have to step out and figure out what it means to be [00:16:00] a business owner and a team leader rather than a.

Team like a doer, you know, the person who’s touching every piece of content or whatever. So it just depends your goals, right? Like there’s nothing wrong with either path. My goal went in starting draft was, I mean, it was initially just like figure out if this was like something I wanted to do. And then I realized, yeah, it’s something I want to do.

There’s a lot of people who want it. So I kind of, my long-term dream has always kind of been to start my own company and run it. And so this has just been like a really good opportunity at the right time and place, but it is hard. And one other thing that’s really hard about it. Letting things go to other people when, you know, you could do it better yourself.

And I still struggle with that. I mean, like there’s some articles that come through and I, I read what the writer wrote and I’m like, yeah, it’s not bad, but you know, I know I would do this better this differently or whatever it is. It’s so hard to let that stuff go. And I, I don’t know what the answer is.

If you get yourself booked so solid that you can’t possibly do it all yourself, that will force you to get good at delegating or you’ll just fail. So that’s one way you can do it too.

[00:17:06] Michaela: Yeah. True. True. Yeah. I think I’m like right now, I’m also in a place in my business that I’m thinking. What are my next steps, right.

So I grew to a capacity level where I just can’t, like, I’m saying no to a lot of things, but I’m not set up in a way that I can take that on and delegate. Right. And, and I, and I know maybe it’s also mindset again, it’s not only mindset. It’s also like, if you’re already at capacity, how do you get a person?

And how do you know, you know, like how do you get them to the point that they could actually take off and do stuff. Right. So even for the podcast, I actually have like, And little advertisement out there that, you know, I want somebody that helps me with the podcast. I haven’t found anybody yet, so yeah, I’m really admiring that you say, well, you have like a couple of full-time engineers, right.

That are writing for you. And then like these large network of people that [00:18:00] are working with you a little bit more in a loosely coupled way and was just in a couple of months. Right. So how did you get the first.

[00:18:08] Karl: Yeah. So this is my process for this. I I’m a huge nerd for process. So like it it’s, it’s excessive at times, but I’ll just like, be bare it all out here.

What I do is I track my time. So I’m pretty diligent about that. And that tells me like, am I spending say eight hours or 20 hours a week writing articles. So at some point I reached a critical mass where I was writing. 20 or 30 hours a week. And I realized, okay, if I want to spend 10 to 20 hours a week on sales and marketing, I cannot keep writing.

I have to stop and pull this out. So I started to look for other writers. And so that was my first step. What I first did to, to hire the very first one was looked into my network and people I trusted already. So I was like to think of the first hire for any position is kind of your trailblazer is how I call what I call them.

And that means. You’re going to give them very imperfect information, but you need them to be smart enough or have worked with you enough to have a high level of trust with you. Like, you know, this kind of goes back to your point about the podcast person. You do want to be picky in that very first hire because they’re going to help you set forth a process, then you’ll be able to imprint onto other people in the future.

So that very first, right? Yeah. Was a friend of mine who I knew could write, well, he had a similar background in writing engineering and he was, we were in the same city. So we could talk if we need to did a great job, he helped me figure out what things are clear and not clear when I pass work over to a writer from a client.

So that was my first step. And then the next thing is to build like a template for what this work looks like in the future. And me and him just kind of like trial and error basically figured out what, what worked and what, didn’t, what I needed to give him, to make him. All the information you needed to write articles.

And then we start, I started to test it out with other people. So I found people outside of my network, who slightly, I didn’t know, quite as well or didn’t trust quite as much, or didn’t have as much experience. I just started to try them out and see what happened. And then [00:20:00] that helped me refine the process even further.

And so by December of last year, I was starting to ramp down on my writing and ramp up with these other writers. I found a new bottleneck and that new bottleneck was, I was spending a lot of time editing and editing was also very tedious detail oriented work that I tend not to be the best at or the, like, it doesn’t, it doesn’t get me excited.

It just drains me. And so I started looking for an editor and I kind of did the same thing. I started with someone, I knew someone I trusted and. Pay them really well. And I was like, look, I don’t know how to edit, but you’ve done it professionally for years. Could you edit this article? And like, help me come up with a process and style guide.

And she’s now our managing editor and she’s full-time and she has a couple other editors she works with now or under her. So I kind of followed this exact same process every time I want to make a hire, just do that account manager. I’d done like a marketing person. And it is hard. It is definitely something that you’re going to like, you have to be okay with that person, screwing some things up.

You can’t expect them to pull everything out of your head, but if they free you up to say, spend more time on the growth side of the business, the sales, marketing, the stuff that generates new business and keeps clients really happy. And coming back then it’s worth those slight hiccups that are going to happen because that’s the only way you kind of get a bigger company.

[00:21:14] Michaela: Yeah, that’s true. Yeah. But you know, the funny thing is that, you know what I did, I started to automate.

[00:21:22] Karl: Well, that’s a bad, yeah. I think that’s a really viable option if you, I mean, this honestly, like hiring people should be like your second resort. Like the first resort should be automating everything as much as possible.

Yeah.

[00:21:34] Michaela: That’s what I tried to do. I honestly, when I looked into that, I thought that couple of things you can really automate very well and they’re nice tools around and a couple of things were still really imperfect, right? So like the editing for the podcast. For example, even though I upgraded my tools and my process.

I actually have is a step-by-step guide, how to do that. Right. But the automation is not completely, like, you cannot really [00:22:00] automate that too much. There’s so much manual, still manual thing. But for example, the whole booking guests and things like this, there is a lot of potential for automation that you can actually do before hiring somebody.

Maybe another topic that I want to pick your brain on is, well, when you hire, right. Do you have also to think about how much of the money that you get from. Business. Right. Are you investing in the higher again? Right? Which for me is also a little bit tricky to do. I mean, especially podcasts, it’s not really making money.

Right. So it’s also harder than to say, well, you know, like you’re hiring people, but how has that for you? Like. Would you say that at that point it’s okay. If the company’s had a loss or does it have to be, you know, positive or neutral or, you know, what is your thinking about how much do you spend for hiring and growth and how much does the business have to, you know, sustain itself as a, as a bootstrap business?

Right. So funded business. Yeah,

[00:22:57] Karl: it definitely, this definitely depends on the kind of company you have and the way that cashflow works and the way that if you’ve raised money, it’s a different thing than if you’re bootstrapping or self-funding. And so I’ve seen it done both ways. Like when I’ve worked at funded startups, the way they did it is, you know, we raise a big chunk of money and that sits in the bank essentially.

And then we start to hire a head of where. It’s like basically you hire for what you want to be at in a year. So we bring on five or 10 people all really quickly. And then we try to like get to the point where we can actually support them. So that’s risky obviously. And if you’re you’re bootstrapping, that’s not really an option.

I didn’t have hundreds of thousands of dollars sitting in the bank to just work from. Right. So, so the way that I did it was sort of when I started draft, I started to think about. Okay. I don’t have a lot of money. How could I build a business? Basically, clients helped me pay for these things. So what we do is we, we get, we get clients pay upfront and that helps us know we’ve got the cash in hand to pay the writers, editors, and anyone else supporting staff that we need.

The. Three or six months of execution. So it’s like, we kind of [00:24:00] make the plan with the client up front and then they pay us and then we actually get into production and then we start paying people, but the client’s already paid us a large portion upfront, or they’ve been on a payment plan or whatever. So that helps a ton with being able to know that what we’re doing is profitable.

The other thing that I do is a forecasting. So basically looking. How much, it costs us to produce an article, how much we can have to charge for that. And then where’s the like margin, you know, the profit essentially, but in how much that margin goes to other things like support staff, other support staff that isn’t really counted there, or services or tools to your point about automation.

I’m big on that too. I spend a lot on. SAS tools that automate a lot of these little things behind the scenes. Yeah. So Zapier and even Calendly and having all that stuff, just kind of automatically do this little administrative work is really, really helpful. And I think it does allow you to run a lot leaner business.

Even if you pay all the subscription fees, it’s still cheaper than hiring people.

[00:24:59] Michaela: Yeah, exactly. That’s that’s also what I. Especially when you’re like, when I was completely bleeding footsteps and, you know, even a $10 subscription somehow really string because they add up, right? Like they add up and if you’re really making zero money, it’s like, oh my God, how I’m going to do that.

But then if you, if you’re a little bit profitable, I think automation is really a. You say, well, I’m paying like 10 bucks for Kalindi, for example. Right. And now it does all the magic and sends email reminders and whatnot. Right. And thinking about how much time I would have to spend here to do that. Yeah.

So in the end, you’re always, is it something like, would you say that you are getting a salary right now? Do you try to, to really you are sustain it as well? Or are you saying well I’m as a founder right now, I’m investing my time before.

[00:25:48] Karl: Yeah, I do take a salary, you know, since the, since it started one of my, I don’t know, one of my, my goals with it was like, I do want to pay myself something.

I, I definitely make less than I did as a CTO to start out. I’ll [00:26:00] say that, but you know, to your point, like I’m investing my time centrally into the business. So I’m working at a discount to pay for the company to grow, which is, you know, a fair deal for a lot of entrepreneurs, you know, with a service business like ours.

Uh, there’s different kinds of companies, right? Some companies like a software as a service kind of tool, you can probably take, you probably have to take no salary for longer because it takes a long time to ramp up to the amount of revenue that you can then pay yourself. But with a service business like ours, that’s pretty high dollar.

We, you know, we make a lot of cashflow into. We’ve got to like, essentially I wanted to build into our cost structure, a person like me to run things because it’s not like I, even if I didn’t work in the company, somebody would have to do what I’m doing. So I don’t think there’s a way that you can run this business as a real business without having somebody in that seat.

Even if I’m working at a discount. You know, keep things going a little longer. I still have to budget something for this in the future. So I think that’s important. I also think that it, again, like, kind of is like business fundamentals. You want to set your business up in a way that can, that it is realistic.

Like if, if you make a small business and it. Like pays you anything like you’ve just made yourself like into a, I mean, that’s, that’s really terrible, you know, that’s a lot of work to get nothing out of it. You may never get to a point where you can sell it or whatever you don’t know. So I think you at least have to cover your basics, but I do, you know, I think it’s also, I would prefer to invest more back into the business than to take more out at this point.

Now I don’t really need a ton of cash, I guess.

[00:27:30] Michaela: I personally always think that you have to love the way and the progress, right? Not only that, because otherwise you could really end up with a lot of regrets. So unless you sat, right, you probably don’t. I mean, it depends on how much you need right now from a supportive perspective on no, how much money cashflow do you need right now to feel that.

And then you can invest into your business and the growth and that’s the end goal. But I also think like if you’re starving on the way, it’s not that it’s not just the [00:28:00] right. Yeah. Yeah.

[00:28:01] Karl: I mean, it depends, you know, if you’ve got a bunch of money that you’ve saved up and that can be your bankroll for a while.

Sure. You might be able to do that. But yeah, everybody’s circumstances are different. Like I knew that I didn’t have that, so I couldn’t start a business that was going to take me two years to pay myself. It just, wasn’t an option. I’ve got a family to help support, you know, so for some people, I think.

Engineers who want to become entrepreneurs? They think like, oh, I’ll just build a software product. And that’s the, you know, I’ll, I’ll grow it. But like the time required to grow, that is huge. And the amount like you have to think and be realistic with yourself, about how much runway as we call it, do you have to make no money?

And if you don’t have a lot of runway to make no money, then maybe that’s not the right kind of business for you. Maybe you need to think about like, eh, is there another more service business where you can get some more cash in the door early? Or is there a. Info product or a course kind of business, you can start where you get more money in the door, early, things like that.

[00:28:55] Michaela: Yeah. I also think that, I mean, even if you do a software product, really trying to gab people paying for it as early as possible is super, super valuable because it keeps you honest. Right? Like having 200 people sign up for freestyle. You know, feels really good from, from an endorphin perspective or dopamine, but is it, is it, is it I actually underwrite way, right.

And you don’t want to feel like invest all the time three years and say, well, you know, I’m, I’m investing all of my time and you know, which is, I think a very noble goal to do, but. Three years you realize, actually not that I want to charge for it. You know, nobody’s really interesting. So actually starting with something and putting a price tag on it, I think is a really good.

Strategy also to know whether or not that is valuable, right. Or, or how to tweak it, that it becomes something that people want to also pay for. Or, and for engineers, it’s not that easy. I think engineers is a specialist species that are, I was actually talking with my [00:30:00] husband lately about what are we paying for?

Right. And there are a couple of. The IDs are all free. I mean, he’s actually paying for it for his

[00:30:09] Karl: ID. I pay for mine too,

[00:30:13] Michaela: but a lot of them are free and they’re really good. And then the other tools are all also free or either the organization pays for it. Yeah, I dunno. I think we are, we are too bunch.

[00:30:27] Karl: Yeah. I mean it is. But the other thing to think about one thing I’ve found that was surprising until I started the, this business was that your pricing will determine your. In a lot of ways. So for example, just in draft dot Deb’s case, if I charged half of what I do, I could probably open myself up to different kinds of customers that I don’t have today.

But the downside is, you know, we wouldn’t have the money to hire other people. So we wouldn’t be able to do things at the scale we’re doing. And so we’d have to scale way down. We’d have to be very limited in who we worked with and it would just be a different company and there’s nothing wrong with that.

There, it just is like different price points end up enabling you or pushing you into different market segments. And so when you go with the free market segment, like you said, that may not be the people who you actually need to pay you later. So companies that do freemium, a lot of times, what they’ll try to do is roll those free subscribers up into a company plan later.

But if you don’t have outside investment, that’s really hard. It takes a long time to get there. Yeah. Yeah. So it, again, it kind of goes to like, be realistic about if you’re bootstrapping and self-funding like, can you really afford to do that kind of freemium strategy? And like, usually the answer is probably not.

Yeah,

[00:31:42] Michaela: yeah, exactly. Yeah. You’re right. So. When I get from what you’re explaining here is that you also have a little bit like higher paying clients, a little bit companies that you have contracts with. So how do you get them? You were talking about sales. How do you do sales? And you [00:32:00] know, like how did you get that?

[00:32:02] Karl: So early on what I did was I said yes to anyone who wanted me to write an article for them. And so what I started to learn was which kinds of companies, what size of companies, what kinds of teams that are hiring me are the ones who are least price sensitive or most willing to pay the highest dollar amount, because they got the most value from the article.

So. You know, for example, I could write the same great article for a team, like an engineering team that wanted some content for their blog. As I could write for a marketing team that wanted content to put out to the public to make sure that engineers knew about their product. It could be the same article that was just as good.

But that marketing team would pay me two to three times as much as an engineering team would because that article leads directly to revenue for the company. So it’s a totally different business model and sit like you have to think about that. When you think about pricing services, there’s a guy out there named Jonathan Stark who talks a lot about value based pricing.

And while I don’t, I wouldn’t say we’re like a value based price service entirely. We think about that a lot, because what he’s saying in value based pricing is you should charge. The amount of value a client gets from your whatever work, your service. If an article is, let’s say for our case, like if a company can clearly make $2,000 of revenue from one article, we write over the course of a year or two, let’s say our articles are a great investment.

You know, that is a clear winner and they will pay us, you know, up to that, whatever, probably half of $2,000, a little more or whatever. So that’s that side one. If on the other hand, the company is not sure of their revenue per article like that. They don’t know how many visitors it’s going to attract.

They’re really nervous about that. Or maybe. They know that each article only gets $300. They’re never going to pay for our services. They’re not a good fit. And so that’s where, like, to me, the, the, the hard part of sales quote unquote, is figuring out who the ideal target market is that has the willingness to [00:34:00] pay and actually gets a good value out of our service.

Um, and so the clients that, you know, sure. I have people all the time and say like, yeah, you guys are too expensive. That’s totally fine. Like, Set up to do that kind of low cost work, but I have a lot of clients that think we’re a great value and they probably would pay more if we charge more. But like, you know, there’s a sort of a limit to where yeah.

The pricing pushes you into different markets. And so anyway, I think that the big part of sales is figuring out how to narrow down your market as much as possible. And so for us, it’s like started off as just like, we’ll write any technical content and then it got more narrow and it’s like, Technical content aimed at software engineers, but then we started to narrow down even further to like start ups who are trying to hit, trying to get in front of software engineers from their marketing teams.

And so now we’re like super narrowed down and it makes it really easy to have sales calls, like, because I basically know there’s only a few hundred companies in the world. Need to work with us anyway. So it’s a really small list. They all know each other’s, there’s lots of introductions and referrals. So you know what, we’re not going to be like the next Facebook size company ever.

That’s fine. We’re doing really well in the small thing that we’re good at.

[00:35:01] Michaela: Hmm. And so you’re also Dan, redirect, you going to a marketing head of marketing and pitching deeper, or how do you, and do you use like LinkedIn or sites like that to find those.

[00:35:16] Karl: I don’t do a lot of outbound like that. You know, there’s kind of two kinds of sales and marketing and it’s called outbound or inbound.

I am not much of an outbound outreach to people kind of sales person every now and then I we’ve tried it a couple of times. It’s just like, I don’t like it. It doesn’t seem to be that productive. We do mostly inbound and referrals, which means that people see the content we’re writing out there in the internet and they say, oh, that company did a good job.

Let’s go talk to them. Or they see, they talk to a, another client of ours who gives them the recommendation or they see maybe my, I share a lot of things on LinkedIn and Twitter. And so they, they see that and they contact me directly through that. We’re also doing some like meetup groups and conferences, things like that too, to kind of get the word out a little more.

To be [00:36:00] honest, like at this point we’ve had enough business from this inbound stuff that we haven’t needed to do a lot of direct outreach. So I think that’s ideal if you can get that set up, but it does take, I mean, I spent a lot of time building a reputation and the connections and networks. So like, that’d be hard to replicate if you were somebody earlier on in your career.

[00:36:17] Michaela: Yeah. Yeah. I’m also completely a hundred percent invalid because there’s just like this. I don’t want to do it. Like I, you know, whenever I get an email from somebody, I don’t know, it feels like spam, but I don’t want them to be that person. Right. Like, I don’t know, like it’s also mindset obviously, right.

Because I know a couple of really, really wonderful, safe people that I also tried to learn a little bit about, and it never feels like they do it in a way. That it doesn’t feel like, you know, it’s this LinkedIn message that you get like that, you know, went out to 1000 people and drinks the same rate. So, but yeah, I’ve never, I’ve never tried it and I’m not really eager to try it anyways, but yeah.

So it’s, it’s inbound. Right. So do you write on your own blog as well? Do you write content for yourself or content

marketing?

[00:37:08] Karl: Yeah. Oh, quite a lot. I try to write at least an article or two a week, sometimes more. Yeah, I, so I write for my own personal blog and then the draft.dev company blog quite a fair bit, although I’ve been trying to get more writers for that as well.

And then guest blogs, whenever they come up, whenever people just happen to see something and want, want me to write about? Yeah. I think writing is a really powerful career booster. Even if you don’t become self-employed as an engineer, I was just talking to one of our writers the other day and they were telling me about how.

Writing this article on some new technology. I don’t even remember what it was, but they got to write this article on a cool new tech that they’d never used at their day job. And they now get to put in their resume, you know, Hey, I’ve worked with this and look, I can prove it. I’ve got an article out there that I wrote, and that’s really powerful because like at our day jobs, like as a software engineer, I would usually get to work in like one or [00:38:00] two languages, one or two frameworks at a single company.

Company doesn’t want to have 30 different tech tools they’re using. They don’t always want to experiment with the newest things. It’s not worth it. But with, uh, with written content, a blog posts, you can go explore and try the try five or six new things over the course of a year and get those published.

And now you’ve got proof that, Hey, I know all the cool new stuff that’s been happening. So I think even if you don’t go, the self-employed. There’s a lot of advantages to writing, but if you do go the, like become a freelancer or consultant or starting a business, having all this writing out there on the internet is extremely powerful.

I mean, there’s people who reach out to me because of articles I wrote three or four years ago. And so it’s just this like compounding interest effect of good content being out there. And so you just never know when that stuff’s going to really pay off.

[00:38:48] Michaela: Yeah. Yeah, I totally totally see that, but it also takes really long time.

Like if you want to run, you have no idea about that tech. It really takes time, right. Especially if you want to. I mean, probably an introductory to something is quite easy to ride, but when it gets a little bit more. Substantial that it’s definitely like, for example, I’m thinking about all studying analysis tools that I analyzed over the last weeks.

Right. So I’m thinking about what I’m going to do with it. And if I’m going to create a YouTube video out of it or blog posts, definitely. I mean, I don’t know how long are you people spending on a, on a Blackboard. Probably would spend from my own block bars. It would take me several days to do that. Right.

To have that blog posts that you want to bring out there. How is that for you? How long do you spend on a. Well, it

[00:39:39] Karl: does get passed. Yeah. There’s definitely different kinds of articles that require different levels of time, commitment and research and all that. But I think you do get, I’ve gotten faster at writing since I’ve been doing it more.

I’ll say that I, you know, before this year I probably wrote a blog post a week on average, you know, maybe. 2000 words or a little less [00:40:00] now I, you know, writing a couple of week and having written even more, some at some point throughout this year, I’ve really taken that average time way down. So I don’t really have a, I don’t know what, I don’t have an hour number or anything like that, but I do know it’s like usually with a good solid day, I can finish up a single blog post unless it’s something really, really specific.

And then maybe it’s a two day thing and you know, it. Uh, you know, whether you should invest the time to get faster and better at writing blog posts. I don’t know. That’s, uh, you know, depends on what your goals are and what you’re looking at do, but even just writing one a month, you know, you think about, again, like this compounds over years.

And so one blog post a month is only 12 a year, but then you do it for five years. And now you’re talking like 60 blog posts. That’s a lot, like a lot of people never write 60 blog posts in their life. So I think there’s some just, you have to think about doing things consistently over time and the value of.

[00:40:50] Michaela: Yeah, true. And do you, do you use any software for, you know, helping you with the writing process? For example, the Rome research would be one, or I’m using obsidian. It’s a, it’s an open source version, which is very similar to it, which I think is a good way to, it’s like a second brain and you can link your resources.

And I think it helps with writing. I recently started like half a year, but do you use something like that for your, for your process to, you know, keep track of what you read and what you want to write about your idea?

[00:41:20] Karl: So definitely I keep a journal call called like a swipe file or marketers called swipe file of ideas and things that I think about throughout the day or week or year, I do keep a swipe file.

And then I also, as I start to like refine a topic, I start to create an outline of like, what ideas do I need to include in this article and how do they link together? So it’s, it’s really hard to write. Just boom, like bam out of blog posts without doing some research and, and outlines for me first. And actually I think this is one of those, like, time-saving hacks that a lot of people don’t do, they just jumped straight into writing.

And so then they get this mess of like ideas and then trying to fix it all later. It’s really hard. If you spend more time researching and outlining organizing, [00:42:00] it usually comes out better. And then I, you know, on the back end of things, like I use Grammarly pretty heavily because I go into back to my, I’m not a detailed person.

Like I I’ve gotten better and faster at writing, but at the same time, I missed punctuation and like spelling and all the little stuff. Right. So Grammarly is kind of my savior there. I always highly recommend if you’re going to write consistently, I think it’s free. You usually, so there’s no reason not to use it.

And even if you pay a few bucks a month, that’s it very well.

[00:42:30] Michaela: Yeah. Yeah. I also use Grammarly and it helps quite a bit. Yeah. Yeah.

[00:42:35] Karl: It’s not perfect. And I mean, we have like re yeah. We have like real editors, human editors as well, because there’s definitely things that won’t catch, but it does, it can get some little things that are, yeah.

[00:42:46] Michaela: It’s really nice. Yeah. There are a couple of things that, because I’m not a native speaker, right. So sometimes it corrects me. I think you’re right, but I’m not right now. Like, and then sometimes I go with Grammarly and sometimes I just leave my stuff because I feel like it’s not always correct. Right. But, you know, yeah.

I really like it. I can recommend it as well. Yeah. It’s really cool. Cool. So maybe the last thing that I wanted to ask you is, so you transitioned from software engineer to CTO, right? So it means a lot of managing as well. People managing and. You know, doing your own thing. I guess this people managing already at the, at the startup already helped you to get a lot of those skills that you need now to delegate, to understand, to hire people and, you know, to have this, I mean, you have brilliant large company already within a couple of months, right?

So do you think that the CTO role and the managing role really prepared you and.

[00:43:47] Karl: Yeah, definitely. There’s a couple of key things that having some roles with startups helped me with. So first I came in as the first employee, basically at the last two startups I was with maybe first engineer, [00:44:00] but whatever is like within the first four people at the company.

So I got to see everything. I mean, you get to see the founders going through raising money and pitching the investors. I got to see how they hired people, how they dealt with. Cashflow and like deciding, you know, how who’s going to do their accounting. Like all these little nitty-gritty things that are not engineering, but at the same time, you just get exposed to, by being in a small business.

So getting to see that firsthand kind of gave me like, oh, okay, those are the things I would think about. If I started my own business, you know, that was part one part two was it gave me a huge. A lot of connections in software startups, which are now kind of my target market for the clients we have. So that has been really good from that standpoint as well as well.

And then the last thing was not being afraid to hire. People, have to fire people have to give them performance evaluations. Like all those management tasks you just said, it was super helpful to get the opportunity to do that in a protected environment. That wasn’t my own company where, you know, I think I tried really hard to be a good manager.

There’s a little less pressure when the company doesn’t depend on you being a perfect manager, you know, like there’s, there’s kind of a, I could have made a bad hire and that’s going to happen. It didn’t feel that high stakes. Now it feels a little more high stakes. Cause it’s my own business and this is kind of how, you know, make a living.

So I do think that that helped a lot. Now there’s plenty of people who do it without that experience. But I think for me that having that like level of experience and background. Did it give me a lot of confidence to make this easier than it would have been had. I just started this straight out of college or something.

[00:45:34] Michaela: And so what is it, what is the end goal for that company? How, how large do you want to grow it as large as possible? Or, you know, like, is there, is there some other areas where you think you could expand to something different, like other services or other products that you could.

[00:45:53] Karl: Yeah, I don’t, I don’t know.

I, I’m not like a, this is funny because like most startups, like they go into it, like the funded [00:46:00] startups, they go into it with a very clear idea of like how big they want to go and where they want to be, what their target total addressable market is. Like, I don’t really know all that stuff. This is a, like, it’s a lifestyle business in that.

It’s fun to run. It’s really interesting and challenging, and it is paying me enough to get by. So like, I just kind of want to keep doing that. Now I do like the sort of growing, because it exposes me, it forces me to learn new things. That’s been really fun. So like growing up. Like account managers had never hired an account manager before.

So I got to learn what that’s like and how do I give them work? How do I keep up with them? How do we pass things? Right. Like all this really interesting, but yeah, I just want to keep doing it as long as it’s interesting and fun to, to run and figure out is and provides challenges. Yeah. And we’ll see, maybe in a year or two it’ll it’ll get, it’ll just keep getting bigger and I’ll be out of my control and I’ll have to like, let somebody who’s more experienced, run it or maybe in a year or two it’ll.

Like the same diseases today. It’ll be fun to run. It’d be interesting. I really don’t know. To be honest.

[00:46:59] Michaela: Yeah. I think it’s perfectly fine. Not to know. There are so many interesting paths that, you know, life can take. And so, yeah, I’m really, really excited to talk with you about all of that and to see how it grew out of.

Keep looking out for the business and probably checking in and ask you, like, how many people do you have now? And I think it’s, it’s good to be open and just explore and have fun on the way up, but there’s not one, one right. Way to do things. Right. So everybody’s,

[00:47:28] Karl: yeah. That’s what I say to engineers all the time who are like, aren’t you afraid you’re getting out of the tech or you’re getting out of engineering.

It’s such a good feeling. I, yeah. I mean, maybe at first I was a little nervous about that, but to be honest, like your career can take weird paths. Like a lot of people have like winding career paths that don’t necessarily just go linearly from engineer to senior engineer, to lead developer, to whatever.

Like, so sometimes taking in diversion and doing something different for a few years or months or something can like open up new [00:48:00] opportunities if you come back. So if I came back to software engineering, Jump into something a little different than I was doing before, or maybe I’d get into the technical documentation or some con you know, hybrid skillset.

Like, so anyway, point being that, like, just because you studied something once for a few years, doesn’t mean you have to do it the rest of your life, that, you know, you don’t have to commit forever. There’s a lot of tangential skills that are, it’s good to be, have some familiarity with software engineering, you know, in the background.

So.

[00:48:28] Michaela: Yeah. And I think, I mean, you’re bringing so many new skills, right? So in addition to the skills that you have, because to be really fair at one point, like if you’re like, let’s say you’re JavaScript engineer for five years, for 10 years, like we are both in this industry probably even longer. I’m definitely longer in this industry.

Right? So what’s like me writing Java script for. You know, 15 years or 12 years, what’s the difference here? Right? So where where’s the difference? Well, when you’re exploring something else, suddenly you have a complete different mental model. Again, you have seen so many other things and then you’re coming back, you’re bringing actually so much value to the business, right?

And I think you are probably even a better engineer than just spending your time just doing this engineering thing without trying to be. Focused on the one thing that you’re doing. So, yeah. And the other thing, maybe so we can wrap that up is that when I started, when I started my business, I was really like, oh, there’s a ride in the wrong way to do things right.

Or listen to podcasts and read books and picked how others are doing it. Right. And I mean, there are so many things you can be on Twitter, you can do condom marketing, you can do DSR. And so it all felt like, oh, if you don’t do this right, if you don’t have thousands of followers on whatever, right. Then you’re not going to make it.

And you know, this is all not true. You can do your own thing in so many ways. You can have a wonderful business without being really [00:50:00] online without having an online presence. You can have like a huge online presence and not as driving business. Right. So. I think it’s really important to understand what drives you on one thing that you said is like, what gives you energy and what drains you?

And I think this is more important, and obviously you will do things that drain you for a short time, but you should really try it. Get rid of them and get more energy flowing activities and maybe hire people or turn your business into something else when you’re, when you’re facing those draining moments.

I think.

[00:50:33] Karl: Yeah. Yeah. Those were, that was my exact struggle. When I first started was feeling the same way. It’s so funny you say that like, there is a quote unquote right way to run a business. I thought, you know, and I thought like, oh, well, if I don’t follow the template, whatever that template is, which you can’t find, you know, like I follow that.

Yeah. I’m going to screw the whole thing up, but like, yeah, you’re exactly right. Is everybody carves their own path. And one of the hardest parts to me about starting a business was not having a boss up the chain to just ask questions about like, I’ve always been a very independent employee, but at the same time, it’s nice to be like, So, what do you think we should do here?

You know, like, look up, look back and just ask your boss questions. There’s nobody to do that to anymore. So now, I mean, I bugged my wife a lot. I bugged my friends a lot, but like they don’t, they’re not going to know the same thing. They don’t have the same interests. So like, Hey, anyway. Yeah. Getting over that is tough.

And it is something you just have to overcome and just be like, you know, go all in on. Once you do accept it though, it’s really liberating. And yeah, to your point, you can run a business a lot of different ways and it’s fun if you pursue it that way.

[00:51:35] Michaela: The most important thing is there is no right way. And there are ways that worked for one person.

And it’s not only how did executed it or the ideas that it had, but also the circumstances that they have been in and so on. And, and I think it’s just being sensitive. I think that I’m sometimes a person that pushes really hard, which isn’t always a good thing. Right. So if it [00:52:00] takes so much. Maybe, you know, another pass would be better, right?

Like if it, if it takes so much effort, this is something that I try to, to realize early on that, you know, if this is now really hard, maybe it’s not the right thing. It’s not meant. Right. So try something else, go step back and try it in a different way. And then, you know, and then it will work out better, I think.

Yeah, yeah,

[00:52:24] Karl: yeah, yeah. Uh, that, that’s definitely true too. There’s a lot of people who start businesses and think that it must be a. You know, grinding uphill, battle, both ways. Like it’s gotta be so hard and they have to eat ramen for years. And like, I mean, I just don’t think that that’s a hundred percent necessary if you’re willing to be a little flexible in like what you do and who you serve and how you serve them, because there’s.

Ways out there to make a living, you know, with your own business. And they don’t, you know, you don’t have to just pick one and stick with it forever. You can kind of pivot around and move and figure out what works best. Find out places where you can actually make a living and not have to work 80 hours a week every week.

So yeah, definitely want to purse. Well, but again, that kind of comes back to your goals. Like, what do you, what are you thinking you want to do? Like, do you just have some idea you can’t let go or are you trying to just make a good living and have a lifestyle? Business. Like maybe I am. So, you know, everybody’s different.

Everybody’s got their, their grand vision, I guess. Yeah. Yeah.

[00:53:23] Michaela: That’s really true. So thank you so much. I think we are in the, at the end of this show today, is there something that you want to tell my listeners, something that you want to give them on on the way, if you haven’t

[00:53:35] Karl: talked about? Uh, no. I mean, yeah.

If anybody ever wants to. Chat more about this stuff. I’m on Twitter at Carlisle Hughes. And then, you know, I’m happy to talk to you about like, if you ever wanted to write some for draft, we always are looking for writers or just want to talk business stuff or whatever else, engineering stuff. I love helping people out.

[00:53:54] Michaela: Yeah. I will link everything in the show notes. So thank you so much for being on my show to. I have a good [00:54:00] day. Thanks. Bye. Bye. I hope you enjoyed another episode of the sup engineering unlocked podcast. Don’t forget to subscribe. And I talked to you again in two weeks. Bye.

Episode 39: From designer to web developer

In this episode, I talk to Annie Liew, who works as a web developer at a startup called Pastel. She transitioned from Design to Engineering, and I want to know how she experienced this.  

We talk about:

  • about her experience transitioning from Designer to Engineer, 
  • the role her Juno Web Development Bootcamp (formerly HackerYou),
  • her new role as the first engineering hire at a startup,
  • her drive to learn and level up in public,
  • and how she managed to build a large Twitter following.

Today’s episode is sponsored by Botany.io – Botany is a virtual coach for software engineers that unblocks essential teamwork and levels up careers!

Subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, Google, Deezer, or via RSS.

Transcript: From designer to web developer

Michaela: [00:00:00] Hello and welcome to the software engineering unlocked podcast. I’m your host, Dr. McKayla, and today I have the pleasure to talk to Annie Liew. But before I start, let me tell you about botnay.io, yho sponsors today’s episode. Botany is a virtual assistant and personal coach for engineers. It helps you adopt better habits, improve your skills or automate your workflows. So how does that work, you ask. Well, great question. Botany connects to the tools that your team uses and crunches through the data to find opportunities for you and your team to improve your skills, strengths, and collaboration, and improve processes and automate workflows. By gently and smartly nudging or reminding you, you stay on top of open tasks and learning and growth opportunities. In this way, Botany smoothly drives your new skill and habit acquisition. I love how it makes code reviews, and giving and receiving feedback a better experience for the whole team. But I guess it’s best you try it out for yourself. For that hop over to botany.io to request access to the tool. So that is botany.io, but now back to Annie.

Annie is a designer who transitioned into software development. I want to talk with her about how she got her first engineering job and how she now build soften his startup as the first engineering hire. So I’m super excited to have any year with me Annie, like come to the show.

Annie: [00:01:27]Thank you so much so happy to be here.

Michaela: [00:01:30] Yeah. I’m really, really glad that you joined. So you have been a designer and then one day you wake up and you say, I now want to be an engineer, or how, how did that happen? And what did you do about transitioning from design to engineering?

Annie: [00:01:47] Yeah. So it’s a bit of a long winded process. To be honest, I studied multimedia design at university and I worked for several years as a designer in Australia and in England. And after that I decided, okay, I wanted to change a pace. I really wanted to move to Japan because traveling is something that I really enjoy. And so I actually went from design to being an English teacher for several years and then decided, okay, I’m going to move to. To Canada and try to get back into design, but because the landscape had changed so much, it was a real struggle. And I didn’t know anybody in Toronto as well. So I basically was in this position where I was just like freelancing on the side, like trying to get my design hustle going. But I was also lot working a bunch of minimal low low-paid jobs to kind of pay the bills at the same time. So I was kind of in this place where I was like, okay, this is not where I want to be. What can I do? How can I level up, how can I get the skills that I needed? And I looked into something called bootcamp. At the beginning, I looked into a lot of UX boot camps, and then I found a school called hacker youth. They’re called Juno now. But at the time, the only. The only boot camp that they offered was a front end web development boot camp. But I really, really liked the community that they built around it. So, you know, I’ve, I’ve built websites in the past before, and it wasn’t something that I really enjoyed. I really enjoyed the designing part of things, but I was always happy to hand off the coding. You know, part two, the developers, however, I did have to build websites and when I did them, I didn’t enjoy at the time, but this time I thought, okay, let’s try again. Let’s see if something has changed. And so I started attending. Small kind of little free, not seminars workshops around the Toronto area. And I was like, okay, what is this? Flexbox what is this? And everything had changed. And so I started getting really curious about it. And so I remember it was really interesting because I never, never thought that I’d be interested in code. But after doing the workshops, I was like, okay, maybe I can do this. And so I applied for the bootcamp afterwards, got a subdued. And as they say, the rest of the street,

Michaela: [00:04:10] Okay. Okay. And so you said you were mainly interested by the community. How did you, was it an online community or was it an offline community and how did you get in touch with the community? How have you, you know, like, I imagine that you get access to the community after you joined, but it seems like you have, you knew the community exists even before you joined this particular

Annie: [00:04:33] bootcamp. Yeah, that’s a really, really great question. And that was a reason why I joined the community. I always have this idea that it’s less about what you do and more about who you do it with. I really, really liked this idea. And so the way like the hacker U has a really strong junior college has a really strong community because there’s a lot of past alumni who shared about the journey. So I, I started contacting them and say, and asking them. Hey, how was your experience? Would you meet up for like a coffee so I could talk to you about it. And I, and I went to several events and talk to a lot of them and every single one of them said, this was something that I don’t regret. I a hundred percent recommended it. This was pre COVID. So the bootcamp was an in-person boot camp as well. So it was nine weeks of 10 to six. And then on top of that, you have your assignments and classes. So it was just like a full-time in-person bootcamp.

Michaela: [00:05:30] Okay, so it’s nine weeks. So you make a commitment for nine weeks. You leave everything other aside, right. And you just go and do your work there. And I don’t know. Do you have homework then? Or is that, do you do everything in class and then you go home and then that’s it the next day you do it again.

Annie: [00:05:48] Yeah, well, it started easy, like off pretty, you know, easy where it was just like the 10 to six, but there’s so much work. And the way that works is that you’re, you’re constantly building, um, projects. So there was no way that you would have been able to do everything just in the 10 to six. There’s been like, it’s, it’s such a fun little, like, it’s almost like a summer camp experience because we all had access to the school basically. And there’ll be nights when it’s like midnight and there’s like all my classmates around me and we’re all just working hard and we have like pizza coming and it’s just a really fun. And that’s what I mean about community as well as it has a really fun atmosphere where you’re doing something difficult. You’re trying to transition into this new career. But they’re doing their best to, you know, support you along the way and make it fun. And, yeah, so it was, I don’t think I actually went to the grocery store for about eight weeks because, and I’m really lucky to have a partner who could do that, but it was just so intense, like the work that I was doing, the purchase that I was doing and what I was learning, I just really didn’t have time. And a lot of people just didn’t really have time to do other things. And

Michaela: [00:06:58] so do you still have contact with a few of those people that you met

Annie: [00:07:02] there? Yes. Yes I do. Yeah. And there’s still a very strong alumni network as well. There’s like a Slack alumni network. I Stu. Do some mentoring and I go back and help, like, you know, current students and I’ve spoken on some panels with them as well for people trying to get their first jobs. So yeah, I’m still an active part of the community. And that’s something I like about the school is that a lot of us alumni are still very active. Yeah.

Michaela: [00:07:31] That’s really nice. And so this thing had helped you also get your first job or how did you make that transition now from, okay. You’re doing this nine weeks and then what happens then?

Annie: [00:07:41] Yeah, definitely. It helped me to get a good job because the school has a lot of industry contacts. And one of the things that they did was that we had an industry day where they invited a lot of potential employee years to a. An industry day where we all kind of showcased our work. It kind of almost works like a blind date. If you think about it, where we all the students were sitting around tables and we had like a, a minute to give out pitch and to talk about ourselves and to share a project that we’ve really proud of. And then the bell rings and then they kind of let go to the next student. So it’s like speed dating. Yeah, it was completely like speed dating, but for employers versus, you know, and like potential employees. So it was really, it was like very stressful because all of us were trying to like practice our speeches and our pitches and, you know, like try to finalize the work that we wanted to show. But as a result of the industry day, I got invited to, to. Interviews with some companies. And I ended up getting an offer, which I accepted a week later. So I was actually the first person from my cohort to accept the job.

Michaela: [00:08:52] Yeah. Very cool. Very cool. And so how long has that a goal?

Annie: [00:08:57] That was, I graduated in summer of 2019 and I started in August. Yep.

Michaela: [00:09:03] And then you worked at that company as a software engineer. Front-end software engineer.

Annie: [00:09:09] Yes. So I was hired as a front end developer and I was there for a year and a year and a quarter. Was

Michaela: [00:09:17] that experience, was that good? Did you feel like now you deepening your, your knowledge or did you learn a lot?

Annie: [00:09:26] So the, the first job I had as a software developer basically was a, I worked for an agency. And what that gave me was a lot of structure around things that you don’t learn in bootcamp. So I got introduced to like agile methodology and stand up and the process of, you know, tickets and JIRA and a lot of soft skills that not soft skills, but a lot of processes, internal company processes that don’t. That you can’t really learn in a bootcamp, but you have to learn them on the job. I also got exposure to one of the very big things was I got exposure to a lot of big, large code bases, some with legacy code, and I also had to build architect sites from. Like the ground-up. So, and I work with so many different websites. It was a, they are a WordPress, VIP partner. So all our sites were done in WordPress, but I was doing like the architecture and, you know, like patient, most CSS and some Jacory as well. But because I had exposure to so many different types of websites and processes, it was a really big, yeah. It was a really big boost I would say, and definitely helped me to get my next job for sure.

Michaela: [00:10:38] And so is the next job that you done accepted? Is that the one that you’re currently at is that the startup that you’re working

Annie: [00:10:44] for? That’s correct. I’ve been there about four months.

Michaela: [00:10:48] And so how does that happen? Like why did you change and why, why did you go from an agency to a startup? What was, what was the interest for you?

Annie: [00:11:02] so I was. I’d been working at the agency for quite a while. And because I was doing a lot of the same type of work, I wasn’t feeling that I was starting to feel like I wasn’t growing anymore. And I was also quite worried about my JavaScript skills in particular, because I was so comfortable doing all the site architecture in patient mode, CSS. And I would basically get, like, I was basically lead in a lot of those. You know, for those projects that came up, but I wasn’t really practicing my JavaScript or react skills. And those are things that we had learned in bootcamp. So it was, I was, I’m going to say that I’m really, really fortunate because Twitter actually played a big part in. How I got this job or this offer, they, the company is called pesto and they were looking for a first hire someone to basically take over the front end. And they had a list of potential people that they wanted to reach out to and interview and invite them to go to the interview process. And I was one of them. So. I didn’t actually apply for this job, but the CTO reached out to me and said, Hey, I’m really like what you’re doing. Sort of some of your work that you’ve shared, and we have this position coming up. Would you be interested in applying for it or going through the process? So I looked at the stack, it was next JS was reacting, was TypeScript. It was all the kind of modern technologies that I really wanted to learn. And so I thought, okay, let’s give this a go. And I did. And I went through like the interview process. I did a coding challenge, which was a take-home challenge for a week. I’d built an entire app for that. It was very stressful. I hadn’t touched react for so long by that point. So it was a lot of learning. I was still working and then trying to do this on the side. Yeah. It was a very, very stressful week. I remembered that, but it was definitely worth it.

Michaela: [00:12:58] So now you are working in that startup and what are your responsibilities?

Annie: [00:13:05] So because they, when they hired me, they, I knew that my JavaScript side of skills, weren’t amazing. And I told them I was very honest with them at the beginning. I said, I’m not going to be like a JavaScript Ninja from the get go, because I haven’t worked professionally with JavaScript for so long. And David very aware of that. So they knew my abilities from the start. And one of my main responsibilities at this moment is just to. Basically level up as fast as I can to get myself to a point where I can just do it really well and eventually be responsible for the entire front end. The other thing I do as well is I build features. We have like a roadmap where we, you know, Look at all the features that we have coming up and I get, and I work on an, on building. Those features. Occasionally we have front end bugs come in as well, which I work on, but the two main things are the side that I am responsible for right now is building features and just like learning as fast as I can to get myself to a spot where I can be super comfortable.

Michaela: [00:14:10] Yeah, I think that sounds like really good next step for you and the ability that you can grow in that role so much, how old is the startup and you know, how does that work? A startup I imagine, right. Like extremely stressful and a lot of pressure or we have to ship. So how does that work in a startup that there’s so much time for you to learn things and how, you know, Is everything actually running smoothly. And so it just doesn’t need that. There’s not too much presser pressure or how does it work?

Annie: [00:14:43] Yeah, that’s a great question. So this startup actually started in March, 2017 and I got hired and started in October, October last year, October, 2020. So they have been going strong for just over four, almost four years, by that point that they hired me and they were. Basically profitable at that point. So they decided to, you know, start growing and becoming like an actual company. So just to give you a bit of context, there’s actually just three people in the startup. Before I got hired, it was the CTO and the CEO and the product guy. So a designer and engineer and operations. So. As they were growing, they realized they needed more help. And that’s kind of what I got hired for, because we’re profitable at the moment. And we have a, our motto of, we have a SAS product that is a subscription model. We know that the money is coming in all the time. So while there is a bit of pressure to ship features and I definitely feel it, I think a lot of the pressure is more the internal pressure that I feel too. Kind of validate that I belong here by shipping features, but I’ve had a lot of discussions with my, my CTO. And basically he said, one of the things that is important is that I’m able to learn to like, basically start slow to speed up later. So. They understand the importance of learning and growing as a junior developer was someone very early on in their career. And they’re thinking the long-term game it’s, you know, I can like probably like try and just like really hustle and ship a lot of features, but would they be like really good features? Well, I actually learned the things I need to learn so that I can do it a lot better. You know, like later on for the company, I think it’s like for everyone involved is really important that we have like a strong foundation built first so that we are able to then, you know, become a lot better and faster later on, I really

Michaela: [00:16:49] liked this long-term vision and long-term thinking it’s something that I think is quite the rare. Even for large corporation that could definitely, you know, invest into their employees. There’s often, you know, a very shortsighted action that I, that I feel like you have to provide value and you have to provide it now. But there are companies that I, that I hear really provide value also to the employees, like for example, automatic and all from several peoples that work there, they have also, for example, I think a really great place to work because. When employees are in trouble, I always heard like they are there, right? Like they give you paid time off or like some time to breathe and to think and so on. And so I really liked that mindset as well, that, you know, they are getting someone on the team and they’re investing in the person and I think. I don’t know about you, but probably it also makes you very loyal to that, to that

Annie: [00:17:46] company. What you said about investment, because that was basically in some of my discussions with my CTO. They are definitely investing in me. So when I got hired, they knew that I had the skills coming in from as a designer and. You know, they didn’t, they wanted someone who could basically have ownership of the front end and not have to worry about, Oh, can you move this pixel here? Can you move that? The light that’s all taken care of. I’m very, very pedantic about those details and let the UX and UI or things. They don’t have to worry about that at all. So he says it’s a lot easier to teach someone to code than to actually care about the product and how it looks and how it feels. So, yeah, totally resonated with everything that you said there. Yeah.

Michaela: [00:18:29] Yeah. And I think this is a really good perspective as well. Right? So you want action to the right people that are caring. And I think also people that feel cared for, and at least from what you’re telling me here, it feels like you, you feel cared for which I think trans translates back. Right. So it’s, it’s like giving and taking. So one thing that I’m super interested in as well is how do you experience. Developing software in a startup, like, what are the processes there? Is it very flexible? Do you have like mentorship? Do you have like code reviews? What about testing? You know, like what you’re telling me, it’s like two people, right? So it’s the CTO and you, so how do you do that? How much, how much formality is there and, and, and who takes over what.

Annie: [00:19:18] Something that we discussed at the very beginning is that with processes, we don’t have processes for processes sake. So that’s because as a startup, we want to basically move fast and iterate on things and be able to push things up. We basically follow a, although not formally, we follow an agile process where we have stand-ups, we do the sprints and we do retroactive at the end of the week to see what has gone well, what could be improved and then kind of reiterate on that. In terms of the, the product development process. We basically have roadmap meetings, roadmap, plannings, every one or two months, basically when we kind of look at the roadmap that we’re building and seeing what features need to be built. And the way we decide what features need to be built is based on the kind of two ideas. The first idea is a, is it something that has been requested? Is it something that customers have requested or is it something that we have some data around how customers are using our app? Is that something that they’re doing often enough? And then the second part of that is what is the potential impact of this feature? So for example, like maybe customers like request something and they requested a few times, but is that going to have a big impact on the company on like the usability of the, uh, like, will it help us to get more potential clients or, you know, so kind of those two things are two things that we think about when we, when we plan out our roadmap and look at all the features that we have available and we didn’t do like a kind of one. One, usually a one month plan where we work on, we prioritize the features that we’re going to work on, and then we just basically go for it. In terms of mentorship, I have a very close relationship. I would say with my CTO slash manager, we do our one-on-ones. We talk very, very openly about things like imposter syndrome, how we want to shape the, the culture of the company, what kind of company that they want to be. One of the things that really impressed me from the beginning was that they said, okay, and this was during the interview process. They said, we are very keen on building a great company culture. They’re kind of the kind of company that people want to come and stay, but we don’t want to have like high turnover. We want our people to feel valued and we want them to have autonomy over their workflow and the things that they do. And we want them to have an impact, but you can definitely, definitely make an impact in our startup. So the TIFA. Management style that they have here is very, very suitable for me because I tend to get bored easily, but in a startup because I’m doing so many different things and have such a, I guess like impact or influence or ownership over the product is I feel very invested in the job and in the company.

Michaela: [00:22:08] When, when I actually started out of university, I thought like, what kind of company do I want to work for? And I was very impressed by these large corporations, but I think it was more the names than everything else. Right. And now over the time, I think my view shifted quite a bit because at a startup you can maybe make the whole, the whole half of the product, right. Or maybe the whole product. There’s definitely something there, which also right now fascinates me more like having more impact, having more, you know, like. Yeah, contributing more and also maybe different heads. That’s something that I liked a lot. Actually, when I was working at Microsoft, I wasn’t a very specific position. Right. It was in the tool engineering teams. And so there, there was a lot of research, a lot of innovation, and that also had like a lot of hats, a lot of flexibility and a lot of impact, to be honest. But then when I wanted to transition, I looked at other teams and said, Oh, I don’t know. I, this is a little bit too restrictive for me. How is that for you? Do you have like several hats while do you have like probably designer hat, then you have maybe the developer hat, but other, other hats, I don’t know, responsibilities that you take over in the

Annie: [00:23:24] company? I wouldn’t say that I have like responsibilities per se, but I would say that I have the flexibility to kind of shape the role that I’m in and. Look into things that I’m interested in. So for example, one of the things that I did probably in the first couple of months is that I joined because with our clients, with our CEO, so that I could like talk to the client specifically and ask them questions about how they’re using the product, how they like it. And so that gave me a lot of. I guess empathy for our users and how they’re using the product. And actually this product is something that I use myself. So I is like, I am the user at the same time as something that I’m building for myself. So it’s interesting, but I also. Yeah. Like, because it’s such a small company, we do a lot of different things. For example, I don’t have to do this. My core responsibility is to build features and like be in engineering. But one of the things that I also do is that. I, you know, sometimes I’ll reach out to people. I think that we get a benefit from, from using pastel. And so that’s something that I do as well. It’s very, very, very, very flexible. It’s I’ve actually never worked in a company that has been so flexible before, like that, like any hierarchy, like structure is like quite flat. So everyone’s just going responsible for everything we have. Like, we communicate very openly and discuss things and it’s very much a process where it’s very collaborative. We all work together. And we’re very intentional about the things that we do that would move the company or move the product forward. So, and also just going back to what you said about mentorship, and one of the things that. Attracted me, I guess, about large companies was the idea of mentorship. And because like, traditionally we feel like large companies have very formal processes in place for mentoring younger developers. So it was something that I was very, very worried about when I first, when I was talking to the CTO, because there is no formal processes. It’s a bit, it’s a bit chaotic in many ways. So I. Asked him about that and we have code reviews. So I think maybe you’re familiar with the idea that code reviews are in many ways, a form of mentorship anyway, because you know, you’re getting your coffee with you. You’re getting a lot of feedback. He’s very good at the feedback as well. He just, he doesn’t tell me, just do this. He tells me the why. And yeah, it’s like very, very detailed and it’s, it’s really helpful. But the other thing that we do very consistently, at least twice a week, if not more, is that we pair on a very regular basis. And that’s been an immense source of mentorship as well.

Michaela: [00:26:04] Yeah, I think to be honest in a company like that’s that small, right? And you have like the CTO as the main engineering person, you have excess. To the CTO, right? I mean, it means that it’s the person that shaped the whole product that knows the architecture. So which means in another company, there will be several layers that you have maybe to go through, or people are really busy maybe also, and here, because there is an investment from the CTO also in you. Right. It’s in both interests to be like pairing and exchanging ideas and learning. And so, yeah, I can imagine that this is actually a really good spot to be in and have like. Almost like, like a really personal mentorship, you know, th there are mentorship programs in larger organizations, but I don’t think that people are that invested right in their mentees. Then probably your CTO is in you. Right. Because there is like higher stakes to make it work for that person. Right. So. One thing that I wanted to touch base, which is a little bit out of context, but you mentioned it at the beginning. And I think it’s interesting for a lot of people that are looking for jobs maybe that are coming out of would come, you know, coming or transitioning or coming out of college or whatnot. Right. And getting a foot into Tash, you said, well, actually by Twitter was super helpful. So. How, how, how are you using your Twitter or how are you building your following? What’s the value that you get out of Twitter and how can you, you know, how can others maybe also benefit from that and let it help them also a little bit in there in the job search.

Annie: [00:27:46] It’s interesting because I was never really a social media person. I had to open our, my Twitter account because my bootcamp made us open the account. And I remember in the very early days, I had no idea how to use Twitter. I was like, okay, I have to tweet something. What do I talk about? How do I connect with people? It was a very confusing kind of landscape for me because it was just a platform that I wasn’t familiar with. And I hadn’t used it before. When it started to change was when I, when the pandemic started and I’d been in my job for awhile and I was very comfortable with what I was doing, but I really wanted to level up. So I joined a hundred days of code and I started sharing my process on, on Twitter. And that was when I started to meet more people, build a community and. Basically, that was how, like my following grow. I, I guess it was very unexpected. I wasn’t expecting it. And it was very intimidating at the beginning, but in terms of why our boot camp made us open a Twitter account, it was because they knew the value of having a online, personal brand. And your Twitter account or any other, like your LinkedIn and stuff, your website is all part of that overarching idea of your personal brand. And it’s really helpful because a lot of companies do checks on you to see what kind of person you are outside of just the code that you do. And people hire other people for soft skills, not just, you know, like they can like, do like a for-loop and stuff, but it’s actually like what, what you bring to the company and. Twitter as is a way to not only kind of show the projects that you’re working on, which I was doing. I was like doing a lot of projects and just showing them, or freely on Twitter and on cold pen as well. But it’s also a chance for them to see who you are as a person. And I think that is the value of like Twitter or some of the other. Um, social sharing social networks as well. Yeah.

Michaela: [00:29:46] Okay, cool. So any, thank you so much for taking the time talking with me. Maybe I want to use the last few minutes to just catch up with things that you wanted to say to my listener, or, you know, like something that you want to leave. People were, I think especially people that are coming from bootcamps would be interested, people that are transitioning. Right. What is your advice for them? What do you think? What should they, yeah. What, how do you think that they could make themselves successful? I set them up for success.

Annie: [00:30:21] One of the things that I heard over and over again was that your network is so important and I really, it was something I really, really. Um, felt when I started to get into coding because when I came to Toronto and I didn’t have a network, it was extremely difficult for me to get into design. I didn’t know anybody. And once I tapped into a network and a community, everything became so much easier. So there is a lot of value in reaching out to people, because at the end of the day, you do the things that you do, you don’t. Build features and products and cold by yourself. You build it in a team with other people and having mentorship and a mentor can also be just someone like who’s a little bit ahead of you. If you can look on your current journey and give you advice on what you can do and just talk to them and kind of encourage you as well, having that kind of connection with someone who is already in the field or with a larger community, I think has a really large impact on, I would say a developer’s career. Something that I heard from somebody I remember this very clearly was that he said that the most successful developers, uh, people who have a large network to draw from, and also they’re not kind of tied into one specific like technology or something. They’re always kind of learning. They’re always open to hearing about like more things and they have like a large depth or breadth of knowledge and. They’re successful because they can draw from all districts areas. And I think that’s, that was like something that had always stuck with me. So. Yeah, like reaching, reach out to people, get involved in community, but also actually do work. The only reason that I was able to probably attract the attention of my current employee was because I was like really, really putting into putting in the hours of all the projects I was doing. And I think it shows as well, like the kind of work that I was sharing. Like I had spent hours and hours on them and just kind of refining my skills, getting better and improving each time. So. Those are things that come across when you’re sharing. And it’s very easy for people, I guess, like as new devs to become very discouraged. When, you know, you’re looking for your first job and you get a lot of rejections and it’s like, it’s really hard. It’s like so crushing, but you kind of have to understand that rejection is not. It’s not personal. It might be just that the company didn’t, it’s not the right fit at the right time, or there’s a lot of different factors and it’s not like really personal and cut you kind of, kind of help you to get over that hump is just to do work that you want to be hired for, or you want other people to see. And I think being able to show and share your work and show that you’re passionate about what you do and that you’re willing to learn is very, is very important.

Michaela: [00:33:24] And so was that work that you showed and that you did, was that outside of work or were you able to showcase the work that you did for work?

Annie: [00:33:34] It was outside of work and that was because the work that I was doing at work belongs to the company and. I was comfortable with the job that I was doing this. So I wanted to learn other skills beyond the work that I was doing at work. And actually this brings out a really good point because something that, that maybe like you kind of feel, feel this as well, like tech is one of those industries where there’s almost an expectation to work outside your job. And I just want to clarify and say like, that is not expected and you definitely shouldn’t do it because like a doctor doesn’t, you know, practice like operations in like his or her free time. And like, I don’t like the feeling that I have to, you know, work outside of my job, but it was something that I wanted to do personally to kind of level up because I wasn’t getting the kind of skills I needed. At my current job at that time. So that was the reason why I did it.

Michaela: [00:34:35] I also think like building up those profiles, then we just touched on before, right. Is something that’s really hard if you’re employed, because most of the time the code doesn’t belong to you. Right. And it’s not something that you can easily share and say, Oh, look at my guitar. There’s my code that I write for my employer. That’s confidential. Right. So if you want to fill your GitHub with nice stuff, it somehow. It means that you are doing stuff outside of work, but yeah, we have to be ready. The realistic that a lot of people are not, you know, they don’t have the position to do because they have like a full-time job they have to care for. Right. So, yeah, I think I understand. And they understand that this probably has a big impact, but it’s also. I also, as you said, I’m not advocating or at all right. That people should, should need to do it, but it’s, it’s definitely interesting to, to hear that that’s the way how you grow your following, how you grow your skills, right. So there is a trade-off that you have to make and, you know, if you’re in a position to do it, then that’s great. And I think it’s okay. Also not good to forbid people to do something outside. Right. I mean, sometimes it’s what you have to do. That’s how it is.

Annie: [00:35:48] Right. And in lieu of that as well. I also think that’s why having a network is so important because that’s how you can get your next job without having to do all the extra work of learning outside of your full time job. Yeah,

Michaela: [00:36:00] exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Any, thank you so much for taking the time and talking with me today, it was really a pleasure to have you. I wish you all the best for your job and that you learn a lot and I will. Continue following you on Twitter and see what you’re doing. And I’m really excited for you. Thank you so much for being on my show.

Annie: [00:36:20] Thank you for having

Michaela: [00:36:20] me. Yeah, it was my pleasure. Okay,

Annie: [00:36:23] bye.

Michaela: [00:36:26] I hope you enjoyed another episode after sup engineering unlocked podcast. Don’t forget to subscribe and I’d talk to you again in two weeks. Bye.

Episode 37: Underrepresented, Underpaid & Undervalued – Having to change jobs to advance your career

In this episode, I talk to Jenn Creighton. Jenn is a Senior Staff Engineer at Apollo. Jenn specialized in frontend-end development is currently working on the open-source work for  Apollo GraphQL.
She also is a frequent conference speaker, an authoritative voice in tech, and recently started her own podcast called single-threaded

We talk about:

  • what a senior staff engineer does, and which responsibilities this title entail, 
  • why she needed to frequently change her job in order to advance her career,
  • how gaslighting, bias, and being underrepresented, underpaid, undervalued is part of her decades long experience as a developer
  • and how she makes sure she is helping others to enter tech and have a better experience.
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Episode 36: From Bootcamp straight into a full-time dev role

In this episode, I talk to Natalie Davis. Natalie is a recent Bootcamp graduate that managed to get hired quickly after graduating. She is vividly sharing her knowledge on Twitter and started to make real waves in the dev community within just one and a half years in tech.

We talk about:

  • her experience at a developer Bootcamp, 
  • how she managed to quickly get hired after graduating,
  • how she keeps up with all the stuff she has to learn,
  • how she decides to adopt best practices,
  • and how to overcome rejections by staying positive and focusing on growth. 
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Episode 31: Combatting tech debt in war rooms

In this episode, I talk to Tomasz Łakomy, a senior frontend engineer at OLX Group. Tomasz is fascinated about teaching everything he knows and has over 170 video tutorials.  

We talk about:

  • how they develop, test, and reviews software at OLX group,  
  • what war rooms are and how they help to combat technical debt,
  • how he managed to create over 170 video tutorials about software engineering,
  • why he is AWS certified as a front-end engineer, and
  • how skydiving helped him to be a better software developer.
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Episode 30: How I got into FAANG companies without a CS degree

In this episode, I talk to Ben Lesh. Ben is a Senior Software engineer at Citadel Securities. Before that, Ben worked amongst other companies, at Google and Netflix. Ben is also the Project Lead for RxJS. RxJS is a library for composing asynchronous and event-based programs by using observable sequences.

We talk about:

  • how he got into several FAANG companies without a CS degree, 
  • the importance of building relationships, and an online brand,
  • the benefits of being helpful and kind to others,
  • the differences in engineering practices at Google, Netflix, and Citadel Securities, and
  • what RX.js is and why you might need it. 
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How to get a job at Spotify during a pandemic – Emma Bostian

In this episode, I talk to Emma Bostian, who recently started as a software engineer at Spotify. And Emma is the kind of person, that not only applies and interviews for jobs, but at the same time writes a complete book about her interviewing experience hunting for this dream job. This book sold so well, that she could pay back all her medical debt. Before joining Spotify, she worked for LogMeIn, and IBM. She won competitions and moved countries several times.

We talk about:

  • her interview experience with Spotify and Google,
  • her experience moving countries during a global pandemic,
  • what makes for a great onboarding experience and
  • how we can take action to make sure workplaces are friendly and welcoming.
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Special Episode 25: From art school to Microsoft Research

In this episode, I talk to myself. Yeah, to celebrate the one year anniversary of the podcast, I tell you about my own journey into tech, and my experiences working at Microsoft and Microsoft Research. I share with you the turning points in my career and also how and why I started my own business.

I talk about:

  • how I got into tech without any previous computer knowledge, 
  • how my dream of becoming a researcher in the industry became true,
  • and why I transitioned to remote work.
  • Finally, I talk about starting my own business because of the need for more flexibility to combine family and work.
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